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Frequently Asked Questions

 What is ubiquinol?  |view|

 What is the difference between ubiquinone and ubiquinol?  |view|

 Why should I be concerned about declining ubiquinol levels?  |view|

 Why does supplementing with ubiquinol become more important as I age?  |view|

 If CoQ10 has been available in supplement form for 30 years, why is ubiquinol only recently available?  |view|

 Can I get ubiquinol from the foods I eat?  |view|

 What are the health benefits associated with WIN CoQ10?  |view|

 How long will I have to take WIN CoQ10 before feeling the benefits?  |view|

 Are there any side effects from taking CoQ10?  |view|

 I’ve heard that WIN CoQ10 “sustains your natural energy.” What does that mean?  |view|

 What kind of clinical studies have been conducted on ubiquinol?  |view|

 What is WIN-CFT?  |view|


What is ubiquinol?

Ubiquinol is the reduced, active antioxidant form of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Produced naturally within healthy bodies, ubiquinol is CoQ10 that has been converted (“reduced”) for use in the cellular energy production process. In addition to its critical role in energy production, it is the strongest lipid-soluble antioxidant available, protecting the body’s cells from oxidative stress.*

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What is the difference between ubiquinone and ubiquinol?

Ubiquinone and ubiquinol are both forms of CoQ10, and both are necessary to produce cellular energy. Ubiquinone is the oxidized form of CoQ10 that consumers are most familiar with; it has been taken as a supplement and studied for more than 30 years. Over the past three decades, CoQ10 has been recognized for its benefits to general health and wellness as well as its support and maintenance of cardiovascular and neurological health.

In order to generate cellular energy, the body must convert ubiquinone into ubiquinol. Without this conversion, the body’s energy production process cannot be completed and energy levels cannot be sustained. Thus, both are critical to sustaining your body’s natural energy.

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Why should I be concerned about declining ubiquinol levels?

Declines in ubiquinol result in less cellular energy and diminished protection against oxidative stress. Ubiquinol provides a strong first-stage defense against this cellular oxidative damage and needs to be replenished to maintain optimum health.

An increasing number of scientific reports indicate that dramatic decreases in ubiquinone levels and increased oxidative stress are associated with the aging process.

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Why does supplementing with ubiquinol become more important as I age?

As a healthy 20-year-old, you readily produce all of the CoQ10 you can use and efficiently convert it into ubiquinol. In fact, the predominant form of CoQ10 in the plasma and tissues of a healthy individual is the reduced ubiquinol form. However, age impairs the body’s ability to produce and metabolize CoQ10. Some reasons for this include increased metabolic demand, insufficient dietary intake, oxidative stress, or any combination of these things. Some reports say this decline becomes apparent around 40 years old, although it can begin as early as 20 in some cases. As the body’s ability to produce and reduce CoQ10 begins declining, supplementation with CoQ10 and/or ubiquinol becomes increasingly important to maintaining good health.

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If CoQ10 has been available in supplement form for 30 years, why is ubiquinol only recently available?

Since ubiquinol is easily oxidized in the air, it has been difficult to develop a stable supply in a reduced supplement form. However, using advanced technology, scientists at Kaneka Corporation have been able to perfect a stabilization process by which ubiquinol remains in its reduced form outside of the body.

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Can I get ubiquinol from the foods I eat?

You can get ubiquinol as well as ubiquinone in small amounts from your diet; however, you would have to eat the foods in such large amounts making them an impractical resource for your CoQ10 supplementation needs. And because the body’s ability to convert ubiquinone to ubiquinol declines with age, food becomes a less practical source of ubiquinol for older individuals and those with age-related conditions.

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What are the health benefits associated with WIN CoQ10?

For those individuals who cannot efficiently convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol, WIN CoQ10 provides support to all cells of the body and is especially vital for organ tissues requiring large amounts of energy such as the heart, lungs, kidneys and liver.* This should result in more energy and stamina as well as better overall health. Additionally, because ubiquinol is an extremely powerful antioxidant, it offers a strong protective defense against oxidative stress.*

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How long will I have to take WIN CoQ10 before feeling the benefits?

Ubiquinol is not a quick fix for those looking for increased energy. Unlike caffeine or sugar which boost energy levels quickly and can cause a “crash” later, ubiquinol offers sustained natural energy.

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Are There Any Side Effects From Taking CoQ10?

CoQ10 supplements have been consumed by millions of people for nearly 30 years without serious adverse effects. That is because CoQ10 exists naturally in the human body, and therefore there are no adverse side effects from restoring this vital nutrient to its normal level. In tests of thousands of people in Japan, Europe and the United States over a period of more than 30 years, no toxicity has ever been shown, no matter how high the intake amount.

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I’ve heard that WIN CoQ10 “sustains your natural energy.” What does that mean?

Ubiquinol is required for the body to generate energy. Restoring this vital nutrient to optimal levels in people over 40 will restore the same type of youthful energy the body produced when it could efficiently convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol and maintain adequate concentrations of ubiquinol in plasma and tissues. Thus, supplementing with WIN CoQ10 is the ideal way to restore and sustain your natural energy.*

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What kind of clinical studies have been conducted on ubiquinol?

Scientists and researchers at Kaneka Corporation have been studying this nutrient for more than a decade and have conducted numerous safety and toxicity studies on the ingredient. Additionally, as a form of CoQ10, ubiquinol will have all of the same benefits of CoQ10. However, because ubiquinol has only been commercially available since 2006, scientists have only recently begun to study the specific benefits of this reduced form of CoQ10.

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What is WIN-CFT?

WIN CoQ10 is a new, patent-pending crystal free technology, WIN-CFT, which provides a clearer appearance and improves CoQ10’s absorption rate within the body. The solution featuring D-Limonene oil helps better protect ubiquinol from oxidization. When oxidization does occur, ubiquinol crystallizes resulting in a cloudy, opaque appearance. By keeping the CoQ10 solubilized, things start to look much clearer and the required amount of oil solution is halved, providing us with a smaller soft gel, all while improving CoQ10 bioavailability within the body.

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